Antique Umbrella Stand

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800′s

Posted on | December 19, 2017 | Comments Off

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800's

Antique 19th Century, Nautical/Maritime “Jack Tar” Umbrella Stand. (SCROLL DOWN FOR ADDITIONAL PICS). The stand depicts a Jack Tar (Jack-Tar, Jacktar) sailor perched above a variety of nautical items including an anchor, oar, chains, ropes & riggings, resting on a base with an ornamental scroll designs waves? And the face of King Neptune. Within the base, there is a removable collection, drainage tray with two tabs for lifting and disposing of accumulated water. Seeing as this was a functional/utilitarian item from the 19th century, it does show some typical wear, mainly from the water which would have collected in the removable drainage tray in the base of the stand. In the two Christie’s items, the oxidation and pitting (in the trays especially) looked far more severe than the item we have for sale. Only the interior of the tray itself shows the normal pitting and erosion of the surface layer from the repeated umbrella drainage/drying cycle it would have experienced. In addition, the base of the stand shows very minimal wear from the same process. Our stand has avoided almost all of this. This stand has a very nice, original finish. When we received it, it had about 50 years worth (maybe more) of dust caked on it which we gently brushed and wiped off. We used no chemical means of cleaning. It still has some dust/build-up in the crevices that can be removed more methodically. We did the minimum required to get it to presentable/clean condition. Only the interior of drainage tray’s finish has worn for the obvious reason that it was a receptacle for water & water and metal don’t play well together. There is also very minimal oxidation in the ornamental design on the base of the of the stand which would have been exposed to drops of water from wet umbrellas, but only incidentally because it was not part of the collection area of the tray. There is one tiny void in’Jack Tar’s’ neck, which occurred during casting. You can see it in some of the pics, appearing as a white spot in the neck, just above his collar. The stand has the subtlest hints of a patination process which reveals a’bronze-y’ color on certain details, especially the folds in the’fabric’ of the uniform and other edges of objects in the sculpture. Around the eyes and neck there is a copper-like patina. We’re not sure about the variation between the subtle bronze-like & copper-like patina but figure it’s a slightly different appearance in more and less-exposed areas. The stand is comprised of four pieces, one being the removable tray, so we’ll just ignore that to focus on the construction of the Jack Tar figure, himself. It is assembled from three separate pieces. If you are looking at similar listings, BEWARE a newer reproduction that was cast with one extra piece, where the upright section of the stand (Jack’s body) is actually in two pieces, bolted together at his feet. There is the base section, which includes the face of King Neptune. The Jack Tar figure and nautical-themed items, are cast in one, single piece where it attaches to the base. The rope which forms the enclosure for the umbrellas is the third piece and includes Jack’s hands. The upright section of the figure is attached to the base with two threaded posts that extend through the base and are bolted underneath with, what look to be, handmade, square nuts, or at the very least, nuts ca. The late-1800′s from when this item was made. (see pics) Note: There is a washer in between the nut and base on one side. We don’t know at what point this may have been installed and was possibly just added to take some of the looseness out of the connection. The rope section with the hands is attached to the upper body via an integral post on one side and an iron pin on the other, which are spread by hammering for a secure connection. On one side, a post that’s cast into part of the main, upright section of the stand, extends through a hole in the rope section with the post end hammered to a flare to make a secure connection. On the opposite side, an iron pin inserts through corresponding holes on the upright stand section and the rope section and is hammered/flared on both ends to secure the sections. 19th Century “Jack Tar” Umbrella Stand. Lower Half of Upright Section. King Neptune’s Face. Full Stand, Drainage Tray Removed. Peg Attachment to Upper Body Section. Hammered Peg Attachment (Underside) to Upper Body Section. Base Section Attachment with Post/Square Nut Fasteners (tray removed). Underside View of Fasteners. Underside Fastener Angled Close-up. We try to keep our auctions as simple as possible so there are no surprises when your item arrives. The item “19th Century Jack Tar Umbrella Stand circa late-1800′s” is in sale since Wednesday, June 07, 2017. This item is in the category “Antiques\Maritime\Other Maritime Antiques”. The seller is “auxygen” and is located in Streetsboro, Ohio. This item can be shipped to United States.
  • Primary Material: Cast Iron

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